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Air Monitoring & Air Sampling Results

In accordance with the 2012 Approved Air Monitoring and Sampling (AMS) Addendum to the SAP, work area air monitoring continues to be conducted during oil recovery activities. Results of work area air monitoring are not uploaded to this website. Air monitoring results are used primarily as a screening tool to identify locations where air sampling may be needed and for worker protection. Air samples are collected over a period of time in a set location while air monitoring equipment is portable and provides instantaneous readings.

Community air sampling and monitoring was halted for the 2011 season on October 28, 2011 based on a U.S. EPA-approved modification to the 2011 Air Monitoring and Sampling Addendum to the SAP and in conjunction with ceased submerged oil recovery activities. However, due to excavation activities within select communities, community air sampling was resumed on December 7, 2011 to collect samples within the community adjacent to the work area perimeter of oil recovery activities initiated at MP 5.92 in the Village of Ceresco. 

Work area air monitoring continues to be conducted during winter oil recovery activities, but results of this air monitoring are not uploaded to this website. Air monitoring results are used primarily as a screening tool to identify locations where air sampling may be needed and for worker protection. Air samples are collected over a period of time in a set location while air monitoring equipment is portable and provides instantaneous readings.

The tools being used to monitor air quality can provide immediate information about the levels of chemicals in the air. To evaluate the chemical monitoring information, toxicologists and health scientists compare air sampling results to health-based screening concentrations (also called “screening levels”). These screening levels are developed by state and federal authorities using all available health effects information about each compound.

Enbridge is using the same air screening levels that the U.S. EPA has been using, including both the intermediate (one year or less exposure) and the chronic (greater than one year exposure) screening levels for the air sampling results posted on the U.S. EPA’s website. These screening levels assume a person is breathing a pollutant continuously (24 hours a day, seven days a week) for as long as one year or (24 hours a day, seven days a week) for greater than one year.

Click here to read more about the compounds being monitored. For example, Benzene in the air is measured in parts per billion by volume (ppbv). Benzene levels of 6 ppbv or less are considered safe for up to one year of exposure and 3ppbv for greater than one year of exposure.

If a call is received on the Enbridge Hotline (800-306-6837) regarding an odor complaint, Enbridge responds with air monitoring and sampling equipment following an Odor Response investigation protocol as outlined in the 2012 Approved AMS Addendum to the SAP.